Josh Fossgreen is a bassist and bass teacher from the San Francisco Bay Area. Proficient in many styles and musical contexts, he’s played from samba to ska, from heavy metal to jazz duos, from pit orchestras to soul bands to funk groups. He loves to lay down a solid groove as much as take a face-melting solo.

Josh is available as a bass teacher for students all over the world thanks to the magic of the internet!

Latest Blog Posts

Bass Scales – Two Octave G Minor Scale

download the pdf here (free!): Bass Scales: Two Octave G Minor PDF

Bass Scales – Two Octave G Minor Scale

In our continuing exploration of bass scales in two octaves, today we’ll learn how to play a two octave G minor (aeolian) scale. We’ll use my special two octave scale framework to get through the scale with minimal confusion and maximum clarity.

I cover two octave scales in major detail in my new ebook which is out now!!! Electric Bass Scales And Arpeggios is over 160 pages, packed full of my best knowledge on scales, modes, arpeggios, finding notes on the neck, improv, ear training, chords, and more. Check it out here: http://joshfossgreen.com/books

Posted February 5th, 2016

Chill Groove Using the Two Octave Major Scale

download the pdf here (free!): Two Octave C Major Chill Groove PDF

Chill Groove Using the Two Octave Major Scale

Following up on last week’s bass lesson on my two octave scale framework, in this lesson we’ll be using what we’ve learned to play some music in the two octave range.

This two bar groove uses the two octave C major scale. In the first bar and a half, we play a repeated figure, and in the last two beats we have time to experiment with playing fills in the two octave range. This is where your practice of the two octave scale will really pay off. The more time you spend with it, the easier it is to keep your mental place in the scale and always know where you are in relation to your root note.

If this lesson is really challenging for you, it just means that you can benefit from more time spent practicing your two octave scales (assuming you’re already comfortable in one octave). You can come back to this lesson again after more practice and see the difference in your comfort level (This is a nice way to mark your progress over time, which is really encouraging).

I cover two octave scales in major detail in my new ebook which is out now!!! Electric Bass Scales And Arpeggios is over 160 pages, packed full of my best knowledge on scales, modes, arpeggios, finding notes on the neck, improv, ear training, chords, and more. Check it out here: http://joshfossgreen.com/books

Posted January 29th, 2016