Josh Fossgreen is a bassist and bass teacher from the San Francisco Bay Area. Proficient in many styles and musical contexts, he’s played from samba to ska, from heavy metal to jazz duos, from pit orchestras to soul bands to funk groups. He loves to lay down a solid groove as much as take a face-melting solo.

Josh is available as a bass teacher for students all over the world thanks to the magic of the internet!

He is intensely passionate about music in all its delightful aspects, and seeks to make the world we live in a funkier, more peaceful place through his work. May all beings be blessed and get their groove on!

Check out his other solo bass videos!
Glass House
Eleanor Rigby

Latest Blog Posts

Beastly Arpeggios 2

download the pdf here (free!): Beastly Arpeggios 2 PDF

Beastly Arpeggios 2 – Full Range (Advanced Bass Arpeggios Exercise)

If you’ve been looking for a way to move around the bass neck more freely, Beastly Arpeggios 2 is a helpful advanced exercise you can use. Just like the original BEAST scale exercise, you’ll start on the lowest note of the neck possible in each arpeggios, move up the neck systematically playing every note in every position, and then work your way down – backwards!

Most bass scales and arpeggios exercises start and end on the root within a confined 1 or 2 octave “box.” I find it very helpful for students to work on exercises where they aren’t always bound by starting and ending on roots, because eventually you should always know where you are in a scale no matter what note you’re starting on.

Here are my tips for applying this to all keys on your own:
– Start on the lowest possible note of the arpeggio, which in this case is any note of the relevant scale
– Work your way up, playing through the arpeggio wth 2 notes per string in each position
– When you reach the end of a position, shift up one arpeggio note, and work your way back down, 2 notes per string
– When you reach the top of the neck, REPEAT your final position in the opposite direction (ascending/descending) without shifting
– Work your way back down the neck in the same way, always 2 notes per string

If you want more help applying this to all 12 keys, check out my new eBook, Beastly Scales and Arpeggios here!

http://patreon.com/joshfossgreen
http://www.facebook.com/joshfossgreenmusic
http://twitter.com/joshfossgreen

Posted October 6th, 2014

Beastly Arpeggios 1

download the pdf here (free!): Beastly Arpeggios 1 PDF

Beastly Arpeggios 1 – 7th Chords (Advanced Bass Arpeggios Exercise)

If you’ve been looking for a way to move around the bass neck more freely, Beastly Arpeggios 1 is a helpful advanced exercise you can use. Just like the original BEAST scale exercise, you’ll start on the lowest note of the neck possible in each arpeggios, move up the neck systematically playing every note in every position, and then work your way down – backwards!

Most bass scales and arpeggios exercises start and end on the root within a confined 1 or 2 octave “box.” I find it very helpful for students to work on exercises where they aren’t always bound by starting and ending on roots, because eventually you should always know where you are in a scale no matter what note you’re starting on.

Here are my tips for applying this to all keys on your own:
– Start on the lowest possible note of the arpeggio, whether it’s the root, third, fifth, or seventh
– Work your way up, playing through the arpeggio wth 2 notes per string in each position
– When you reach the end of a position, shift up one arpeggio note, and work your way back down, 2 notes per string
– When you reach the top of the neck, REPEAT your final position in the opposite direction (ascending/descending) without shifting
– Work your way back down the neck in the same way, always 2 notes per string

If you want more help applying this to all 12 keys and all five different types of seventh chords, check out my new eBook, Beastly Scales and Arpeggios here!

http://patreon.com/joshfossgreen
http://www.facebook.com/joshfossgreenmusic
http://twitter.com/joshfossgreen

Posted October 6th, 2014